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How Did Jimmy Page Learn Guitar

How Did Jimmy Page Learn Guitar?

Jimmy Page has been rated the second-best guitarist of all time by Rolling Stone Magazine. However, among most guitarists, he has been counted as the first best guitarist in the world.  Being featured on this competitive list is a challenging task. This made us wonder how Jimmy Page learned to play the guitar.

Jimmy Page learned to play the guitar by listening to recordings at 33 rpm and studying each song note by note. Jimmy Page also possessed the book “Play in a Day,” which taught him different chord structures and practice activities.

Continue reading to find out how Jimmy Page became one of the most recognizable rockers of the classic rock period.

When Did Jimmy Page Begin Playing Guitar?

Jimmy Page began playing guitar when he was 12 years old, in 1956. He began playing after a previous owner or relative left an acoustic guitar in Jimmy Page’s residence.

Jimmy began his guitar career in 1963 when he was asked to participate in a session with John Carter. Jimmy was immediately drawn to the ancient acoustic guitar that had been left. Jimmy’s father got him a 1958 Resonet Grazioso Futurama after he learned and spent hours on the acoustic.

How Did Jimmy Page Learn to Play the Guitar?

Jimmy Page learned to play the guitar by listening to 45 rpm songs, slowing them down to 33 rpm, and practicing the solos note for note. Many of Jimmy Page’s contemporaries learned to play guitar primarily through albums. He would listen to early rock greats, particularly Elvis Presley, and examine every note in every song by ear.

There were few guitarists in the region around Jimmy at the time. Nobody was in the vicinity of Epsom. The only person he saw was a boy playing guitar on the school field. Jimmy introduced himself, and the youngster invited him to join him. Jimmy was then taught how to tune his guitar and a few fundamental chords to get started.

He began by strumming fundamental chords. He mentions how the instrument itself drew him to so many various types of music where the guitar was used. Jimmy explored a range of genres with guitar-centric tunes as a result of this interest. This included everything from country blues to rockabilly. He then began to establish his own style by combining all of the genres he listened to.

Jimmy spent hours practicing those chords before purchasing the book “Play in a Day.” Bert Weedon wrote “Play in a Day” to simplify the guitar learning process. Jimmy Page learned from this book rather than taking lessons. He learned various chords, how to construct chord charts, how to hold the guitar properly, and other practice activities to perform. Many other guitar luminaries, like Eric Clapton and George Harrison, credit this book as one of the foundations of their musical education.

“Play in a Day” and After that Section

Jimmy continued to study through albums and “Play in a Day” until he was hired as a studio musician to play on sessions. As a studio musician, if you repeatedly made mistakes or played inconsistently, word would get out, and you would not be invited back. Jimmy was an incredibly adept and precise studio guitarist as a result of his note-for-note careful study, making him a popular commodity in England. In addition, he took the opportunity to study sound engineering before becoming a producer himself.

He became more well-known as a fantastic studio guitarist. Jimmy made the decision to learn how to read music. Jimmy Page did not learn to read music in school; instead, he taught himself. He values the ability to read music highly. This is due to the fact that it provides musicians and guitarists with the capacity to compose notation.

If you weren’t technically educated or didn’t have a guitar instructor at the time, this is how you learned, and it’s how Jimmy Page came to revolutionize the guitar industry with Led Zeppelin.

Who Were Jimmy Page’s Most Influential People?

Jimmy Page has stated several times that he was part of the generation that was attracted by Rock n’ Roll on their radios. Guitarists like Jimmy would focus on the radio, listening to a shuffled selection of early rock until they could afford to buy the albums and listen to them till they were exhausted. Let’s take a look at the musicians who had the largest influence on Jimmy Page.

As previously said, Jimmy Page was influenced by a wide range of musical styles. Little Richard impacted him on the big band side. Elvis Presley, Bill Black, and Scotty Moore were among the Rockabilly performers.

Lonnie Donegan’s Skiffle was his first musical inspiration. “With Skiffle, Lonnie Donegan made it appear like it was feasible to reach the music,” Page says. And I had an untuned guitar in the home that no one had ever played.” His musical adventure thereafter began.

His early influences were primarily from the Rockabilly genre. It was most notably James Burton and Scotty Moore. Those were all two Rockabilly guitarists that accompanied Elvis Presley on stage. Page was enamored with the rock trio, remarking that it was unlike any other Rockabilly he had heard. Referencing how the guitar playing was so abstract in comparison to anything he had heard previously.

Jimmy’s enthusiasm for Rockabilly evolved into a love of the Blues. Page studied blues guitarists such as Muddy Waters, Albert King, Leadbelly, Peter Green, and Robert Johnson. The influence of Robert Johnson is notably noticeable in early Led Zeppelin tracks. Peter Green, Fleetwood Mac’s guitarist, was also a huge influence on Page. So much so that Jimmy referred to Peter Green as “England’s greatest blues guitarist.”

How Many Hours Per Day Did Jimmy Page Practice Guitar?

While still in school, Jimmy Page practiced 3 to 4 hours every day. He learned by slowing down songs and listening to them, a time-consuming method that necessitates rigorous ear training. He became a full-time musician shortly after becoming a studio session guitarist. Jimmy Page might spend a few hours or an entire day in the studio as a session guitarist, relying on the artist he is recording for.

What Kind of Guitars Does Jimmy Page Play?

Jimmy Page has used a variety of guitars during his career, including the Fender Telecaster.

The Gibson Les Paul Deluxe, a Gibson EDS-1275 with a double neck, and the Danelectro 3021. His favorite guitar, though, is a 1959 Gibson Les Paul standard. He’s also played a Les Paul Custom with three pickups and a Fender Telecaster.

Jimmy Page’s favorite guitar was a 1959 Gibson Les Paul Standard he purchased from Joe Walsh for $500. He originally played it on the album Zeppelin 2, and it became one of his favorite guitars; he nicknamed it “number one.” He claims that the bridge humbucker pickup helps him achieve the tone of Peter Green’s Les Paul. Gibson replicated number 1 in 2004 and labeled it the Jimmy Page Les Paul someplace out there; there are 25 guitars autographed by Jimmy Page and a total of 150 number 1s.

Jimmy Page’s first guitar was a Futurama Grazioso, a three-pickup electric guitar. He also uses an acoustic Martin D-28 guitar.

What Strings Did Jimmy Page Use?

Jimmy Page employs thin strings. 09 super slinky strings, the same strings as fellow guitarist Angus Young. These strings are great for musicians like Jimmy because they are simple to bend, sound brighter in the treble area, and allow for effortless finger plucking.

Jimmy Page’s strings have gauges of.009,.011,.016,.024w.032, and.042. These strings were used on all of Jimmy’s electric guitars, including the double-necked Gibson SG and early Telecaster.

Slinky strings from the late 1960s and early 1970s were all nickel. Nickel-plated Slinkys were introduced in the early to mid-1970s. These are the most used today and are used by guitarists of all genres.

What Pickups Did Jimmy Page Use?

In his Fender Telecaster, Jimmy Page utilized hand-wound ’58 single-coil pickups, and in his Gibson Les Paul, he used Gibson PAF Humbuckers. Jimmy upgraded the bridge pickup with T-Top Midranges in 1972.

In His Fender Telecaster

Hand-wound ’58 single-coil pickups were utilized in Jimmy Page’s ’59 Fender Telecaster. These pickups, which were popular in the late 1950s, had a high central pole. Hand-wound pickups were popular because they produced a warmer tone with the less high-end.

This guitar would contribute to the classic Yardbirds sound as well as the early Led Zeppelin sound. Page used this guitar, which was given to him by Jeff Beck, to record the first Led Zeppelin album, Led Zeppelin 1, in 1968-1969. The rich tone of hand-wound ’58 single-coil pickups is what you hear on this record.

In His Gibson Les Paul

Page originally utilized Gibson PAF Humbucker pickups in his Les Paul, with internal wiring alterations to increase the thrust of the sound. Later, in 1972, he replaced the bridge pickup with T-Top midranges to give more “squawk” to the tone.

Jimmy Page obtained his renowned number one Les Paul from Joe Walsh, who requested that Page purchase it. The instrument featured several bespoke alterations and intricate wiring. The pickups were one of the guitar’s distinguishing features.

The phaser on the pickups may be reversed on the instrument. Jimmy notes how inverting the phaser produces a close match to the sound of Peter Green. Jimmy is still determining if this model of Les Paul had out-of-phase pickups. Despite the fact that Jimmy did that on purpose and has done it ever since with his future Les Pauls. Jimmy uses a push-pull button on the bottom right of the guitar’s body to toggle the reverse phase on the neck pickup.

Jimmy noted a drop in pickup output in 1972. He replaced the bridge pickup with the vintage T-Top Midrange after performing in Australia. This is frequently the sought sound that many lead heads want.

2 Best Jimmy Page Tone Pickups

Jimmy’s tone was mostly in his fingertips. His playing technique and touch are what genuinely distinguish him. However, if you lack inherent Jimmy Page-like skill, as 99 percent of guitarists do, what pickups will help you come closer to Jimmy Page’s tone? Let us investigate.

Seymour Duncan Whole Lotta Humbucker Pickups

The Seymour Duncan Whole Lotta Humbucker pickups are used to provide Jimmy Page’s tone. Duncan’s goal with these pickups was to give a tone close to old PAF pickups. As the name implies, most of the pickups’ design was inspired by late-50s PAF pickup tones, such as those utilized by Jimmy Page.

These picks have received nothing short of rave reviews. Many guitarists, like myself, think these pickups are warm and balanced, producing a traditional humbucker tone. The best way to describe them is articulate. Many reviews praise them for their “Jimmy Page” sound, indicating that Duncan accomplished their aim with these pickups.

T-Top and PAF Pickup Combo

This pickup combo is ideal for individuals who have a little extra money to invest and are determined to sound as close to Jimmy as possible. If you can get authentic Gibson 1958 PAF humbuckers, that will get you near to Page’s number one Les Paul tone.

The next step would be to obtain a T-Top Midrange pickup for the bridge pickup. The combination of the two would provide a sound quite close to post-1972 Led Zeppelin.

Final Thoughts

Jimmy Page’s sound epitomizes Classic Rock. The tone he imbued with Led Zeppelin is instantly identifiable and desired by many guitarists. In this article, we examined when Jimmy Page started playing the guitar, how he learned to play the guitar, and which guitars and equipment he used. We know that Jimmy Page, who revolutionized the guitar world and played a major role in the legend of Led Zeppelin, learned to play the guitar on his own, just like many legendary guitarists.

If you want to enter the guitar world and learn the basics of playing the guitar or want to progress in playing the guitar, you can follow the Deplike Blog. Moreover, you can learn how to play your favorite songs using Deplike Guitar Learning App, and you can reach the guitar tones you dream of with the Deplike App. Moreover, there are various plug-ins you can use in Deplike to create your own unique guitar tone. If you want to be a signature guitarist like Jimmy Page, stay tuned to Deplike!

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